News & Events


Please read below for details on new courses, e-lectures, and other important developments in the legal training arena.


Owning a Business: Things you need to Know

Posted by on 15 Aug 2017 in Business Coaching, Continuing Professional Development, Current Affairs, E-learning, Law, Mentoring | 0 comments

Owning a Business: Things you need to Know

A short book of mentoring suggestions by Richard Eaton. As a business mentor, I find that I am repeatedly being asked the same questions. Where can I find finance for my business? How can I best make use of social media for advertising my business? Where do I look for business support services? What steps can I take regarding cyber-security? Should I form a Company or work as a sole trader? What do I need to think about when employing staff or taking an apprentice? And, of course, many more questions. To make better use of my time and that of...

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Does The European Court of Human Rights defend Democracy?

Posted by on 11 Jul 2015 in Current Affairs, European Union, Government Policy, Judicial System, Law | 0 comments

Does The European Court of Human Rights defend Democracy?

The relationship between the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR), the UK Parliament and our national courts is complex and problematic. The 2012 Brighton Declaration called for ‘information, proposals and views’ on reforming the Strasbourg court. Subsequently, in 2014, The Council of Europe identified weaknesses at the ECHR including a backlog of cases, an inadequate level of resources and poor implementation of the Human Rights Convention at national level. The UK has repeatedly threatened to withdraw from the Convention. It is now in the...

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What Price Justice?

Posted by on 10 Jul 2015 in Current Affairs, Government Policy, Judicial System, Law, Uncategorized | 0 comments

What Price Justice?

In the recent Court of Appeal (CA) case of Lindner v. Rawlins, reported in the Times Law Reports on 7th April 2015 and for which judgment was given on 10th February 2015, three CA judges heard the appeal of a litigant in person from whom legal aid had been withdrawn. As the case involved issues of legal complexity that the litigant could not be expected to deal with and as he was not represented, the court was required to research the law for itself and to review a large amount of documents. This involved ‘an expensive use of judicial time,...

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Where Crime and Commerce Collide

Posted by on 18 Jun 2012 in Corporate Law, Criminal Law, Government Policy, Judicial System, Law | 0 comments

Where Crime and Commerce Collide

Every year, thousands of victims are targeted by sophisticated career criminals often using advanced technology to promote fraudulent financial schemes to the estimated value of about £500m. On average, an innocent victim loses about £20,000 although one of the largest individual losses amounted to £6m. The National Fraud Authority, the Financial Services Authority, the City of London’s Economic Crime Directorate and the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau, set up by the City of London Police in 2010, are some of the organisations which are...

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Who Guards the Guardians?

Posted by on 18 Jun 2012 in Criminal Law, Current Affairs, Judicial System, Law | 0 comments

Who Guards the Guardians?

Is a proposed increase in surveillance by the state a necessary security precaution or an unnecessary breach of civil liberty? Many would argue that the UK has one of the most liberal societies in the world and that the challenge is to keep it that way. The government has proposed, in the draft Communications Data Bill, that information about internet use should be kept by internet service providers (such as British Telecom, Virgin and Sky) for a year to allow the police, security services and HM Revenue & Customs to have access to it....

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European law & UK Sovereignty

Posted by on 18 Jun 2012 in Current Affairs, European Union, Judicial System, Law | 0 comments

European law & UK Sovereignty

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in Strasbourg has a backlog of about 150,000 cases and some believe it has become too powerful, that it is unaccountable and that it has discredited the concept of Human Rights as it fails to permit the UK government  flexibility in implementing the Convention (called “The margin of appreciation”) and also fails to accept the authority of  the UK national courts (“Subsidiarity”). Is the UK government right to seek to reduce the role of the ECHR by limiting the number of cases referred to it? Should...

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Freedom, the Law & the Individual

Posted by on 18 Jun 2012 in Current Affairs, Government Policy, Judicial System, Law | 0 comments

Freedom, the Law & the Individual

Part 1: Protesters at St Pauls Cathedral, London. Aspects of the current state of the law relating to public protest and demonstration were considered in the recent high-profile case of The Mayor, Commonality and Citizens of the City of London v. Tammy Samede & Others. The Court of Appeal confirmed that possession orders and injunctions removing demonstrators from the site outside St Pauls Cathedral, London, and forbidding their return were proportionate in law. In the High Court, the trail judge had previously held that the highways...

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Short Course: The Law of Contract

Posted by on 23 Aug 2011 in Continuing Professional Development, New Courses | 0 comments

Short Course: The Law of Contract

An Introduction to the Law of Contract The law relating to contracts and contractual liability affects every agreement applied in a business context. This intensive course aims to raise the awareness of relevant personnel about some of the legal complexities which they will encounter in this intellectually challenging and litigious area of the law. This intensive and instructive short course will address the following questions, the answers to which are of importance to all of those involved in the preparation, negotiation and supervision of...

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European Law and UK Sovereignty

Posted by on 17 Feb 2011 in European Union | 0 comments

European Law and UK Sovereignty

EU Directives and Regulations and the judgements of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in Luxembourg increasingly affect our lives and the sovereignty of Parliament. For instance, can British courts be compelled to fine or imprison people for breaking EU laws, even if the Government and Parliament are opposed? Writing in The Sunday Times Newspaper (“The March of human rights stops here”), on the 17 April 2011, Dominic Raab MP said: “The European Court of Human Rights issued a blunt riposte last week to the government’s appeal against its...

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Personal Injuries at work

Posted by on 17 Feb 2011 in Corporate Law | 0 comments

Personal Injuries at work

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) states “The reality is that over 200 people a year lose their lives at work in Britain. In addition, around 150,000 non-fatal injuries are reported each year and an estimated 2 million suffer from ill health caused or made worse by work”. Whether you are an employer or an employee, can you afford to ignore the law relating to Health and Safety at work?   On the 17 February 2011 Cotswold Geotechnical (Holdings) was fined £385,000 over the death of a junior geologist. This sentence follows...

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